Thursday, March 11, 2010

Angel Bottom's Ezine #1

Welcome to the first edition of the Angel Bottom's Ezine! I will be publishing it on this blog until I get hosting sat up again for the website.

Table of Contents:

1. Top Sponsor Ads
2. Privacy Policy
3. What's New!
4. Freebies
5. Homemaking Tip
6. Helpful Websites
7. Article
8. Article
9. Homemaking Tip

Top Sponsor Ad:

http://www.homemaking-cottage.com/

The Homemaking Cottage is here to inspire, encourage, teach and support all women in the home: homemakers and housewives! How do we do this? With recipes, crafts, and other inspirational articles, eBooks, and our exclusive Deluxe Edition . This website is updated regularly. We invite you to visit often for the latest articles.

What's New!

Welcome to the first edition of the Angel Bottom's Ezine! I will be writing homemaking articles, tips, and listing what's new in my store. The special in this edition is buy one ebook, get one free! You buy from the store http://www.angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/ then you send me an email with the ones you want for free. The new listings are not including in this special.

New Ebooks this edition:

Brick and Mortar Business for Newbies http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7201362
Buying Triggers: 100 Mind Altering Selling Tools http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7201541
Hot New Business http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7202603
How Ordinary People Make Big Money on the Internet http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7203080
How to Attract a Flood of Clients http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7204943
Selling Your Way to Your First Million http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7208018
Turning Browsers into Buyers - 5 Day ecourse
Worm Farming http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7213347
Baby Shower Guide http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7199410
Magazine Publishing http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7211203
Wedding Photography Tips http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7213376
Breaking Through Learning Disabilities http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7200950
101 Tips for Enhancing Your Love Life http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7195323
Improving Your Marriage to Newlyweds Again http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7210646
Banish Bad Habits http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7200446
I Don't Remember http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7209975
The Perfect Diet http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7213289
Natural Weight Loss http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7213137
Quick Weight Loss Action http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7213251
Massage Therapy-Feel Better Through Massage http://angelbottomsboutique.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=7212973


Freebies~

How to Tell Stories to Children

http://tinyurl.com/y89q4ap

Homemaking Tip~

Save Money By Making Your Own Laundry Detergent

Homemaking Tip #1

Homemade Liquid Laundry Soap- Front or top load machine

4 Cups - hot tap water
1 Fels-Naptha soap bar
1 Cup - Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda*
½ Cup Borax

- Grate bar of soap and add to saucepan with water. Stir continually over medium-low heat until soap dissolves and is melted.

-Fill a 5 gallon bucket half full of hot tap water. Add melted soap, washing soda and Borax. Stir well until all powder is dissolved. Fill bucket to top with more hot water. Stir, cover and let sit overnight to thicken.

-Stir and fill a used, clean, laundry soap dispenser half full with soap and then fill rest of way with water. Shake before each use. (will gel)

-Optional: You can add 10-15 drops of essential oil per 2 gallons. Add once soap has cooled. Ideas: lavender, rosemary, tea tree oil.

-Yield: Liquid soap recipe makes 10 gallons.

-Top Load Machine- 5/8 Cup per load (Approx. 180 loads)

-Front Load Machines- ¼ Cup per load (Approx. 640 loads)

*Arm & Hammer "Super Washing Soda" - in some stores or may be purchased online here (at Meijer.com). Baking Soda will not work, nor will Arm & Hammer Detergent - It must be sodium carbonate!!

Powdered Laundry Detergent - Top load machine

1 Fels-Naptha soap bar
1 Cup - Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda*
½ Cup Borax

-Grate soap or break into pieces and process in a food processor until powdered. Mix all ingredients. For light load, use 1 Tablespoon. For heavy or heavily soiled load, use 2 Tablespoons. Yields: 3 Cups detergent. (Approx. 40 loads)

*Arm & Hammer "Super Washing Soda" - in some stores or may be purchased online here (at Meijer.com). Baking Soda will not work, nor will Arm & Hammer Detergent - It must be sodium carbonate!!

TIPS FOR LAUNDRY SOAP: We use Fels-Naptha bar soap in the homemade soap recipes, but you can use Ivory, Sunlight, Kirk's Hardwater Castile or Zote bars. Don't use heavily perfumed soaps. We buy Fels-Naptha by the case from our local grocer or online. Washing Soda and Borax can often be found on the laundry or cleaning aisle. Recipe cost approx. $2 per batch.

Inexpensive Fabric Softener Recipes

Recipe #1
1 Cup White Vinegar
Add vinegar to rinse cycle. Works great. Removes residue and odors. Also helps to keep washing machine and hoses fresh and clean too.

Recipe #2

1 Container of Name Brand Fabric Softener
4 Inexpensive sponges, cut in half

Pour entire container of softener into a 5 gallon bucket. Fill empty softener container with water twice. (2 parts water to 1 part softener) Add sponges to softener/water mixture. When ready to use wring out extra mixture from one sponge and add to the dryer as you would a dryer sheet.


Helpful Websites~

http://www.homemaking-cottage.com/
http://www.livingdeliberatelydaily.blogspot.com/
http://www.veganfamilystyle.blogspot.com/

Titus 2:3-5

3Likewise, teach the older women to be reverent in the way they live, not to be slanderers or addicted to much wine, but to teach what is good. 4Then they can train the younger women to love their husbands and children, 5to be self-controlled and pure, to be busy at home, to be kind, and to be subject to their husbands, so that no one will malign the word of God.


MAKING A GARDEN

The first thing in garden making is the selection of a spot. Without a choice, it means simply doing the best one can with conditions. With space limited it resolves itself into no garden, or a box garden. Surely a box garden is better than nothing at all.

But we will now suppose that it is possible to really choose just the right site for the garden. What shall be chosen? The greatest determining factor is the sun. No one would have a north corner, unless it were absolutely forced upon him; because, while north corners do for ferns, certain wild flowers, and begonias, they are of little use as spots for a general garden.

If possible, choose the ideal spot a southern exposure. Here the sun lies warm all day long. When the garden is thus located the rows of vegetables and flowers should run north and south. Thus placed, the plants receive the sun's rays all the morning on the eastern side, and all the afternoon on the western side. One ought not to have any lopsided plants with such an arrangement.

Suppose the garden faces southeast. In this case the western sun is out of the problem. In order to get the best distribution of sunlight run the rows northwest and southeast.

The idea is to get the most sunlight as evenly distributed as possible for the longest period of time. From the lopsided growth of window plants it is easy enough to see the effect on plants of poorly distributed light. So if you use a little diagram remembering that you wish the sun to shine part of the day on one side of the plants and part on the other, you can juggle out any situation. The southern exposure gives the ideal case because the sun gives half time nearly to each side. A northern exposure may mean an almost entire cut-off from sunlight; while northeastern and southwestern places always get uneven distribution of sun's rays, no matter how carefully this is planned.

The garden, if possible, should be planned out on paper. The plan is a great help when the real planting time comes. It saves time and unnecessary buying of seed.

New garden spots are likely to be found in two conditions: they are covered either with turf or with rubbish. In large garden areas the ground is ploughed and the sod turned under; but in small gardens remove the sod. How to take off the sod in the best manner is the next question. Stake and line off the garden spot. The line gives an accurate and straight course to follow. Cut the edges with the spade all along the line. If the area is a small one, say four feet by eighteen or twenty, this is an easy matter. Such a narrow strip may be marked off like a checkerboard, the sod cut through with the spade, and easily removed. This could be done in two long strips cut lengthwise of the strip. When the turf is cut through, roll it right up like a roll of carpet.

But suppose the garden plot is large. Then divide this up into strips a foot wide and take off the sod as before. What shall be done with the sod? Do not throw it away for it is full of richness, although not quite in available form. So pack the sod grass side down one square on another. Leave it to rot and to weather. When rotted it makes a fine fertilizer. Such a pile of rotting vegetable matter is called a compost pile. All through the summer add any old green vegetable matter to this. In the fall put the autumn leaves on. A fine lot of goodness is being fixed for another season.

Even when the garden is large enough to plough, I would pick out the largest pieces of sod rather than have them turned under. Go over the ploughed space, pick out the pieces of sod, shake them well and pack them up in a compost heap.

Mere spading of the ground is not sufficient. The soil is still left in lumps. Always as one spades one should break up the big lumps. But even so the ground is in no shape for planting. Ground must be very fine indeed to plant in, because seeds can get very close indeed to fine particles of soil. But the large lumps leave large spaces which no tiny root hair can penetrate. A seed is left stranded in a perfect waste when planted in chunks of soil. A baby surrounded with great pieces of beefsteak would starve. A seed among large lumps of soil is in a similar situation. The spade never can do this work of pulverizing soil. But the rake can. That's the value of the rake. It is a great lump breaker, but will not do for large lumps. If the soil still has large lumps in it take the hoe.

Many people handle the hoe awkwardly. The chief work of this implement is to rid the soil of weeds and stir up the top surface. It is used in summer to form that mulch of dust so valuable in retaining moisture in the soil. I often see people as if they were going to chop into atoms everything around. Hoeing should never be such vigorous exercise as that. Spading is vigorous, hard work, but not hoeing and raking.

After lumps are broken use the rake to make the bed fine and smooth. Now the great piece of work is done.


ABC OF SOUP MAKING

Lean, juicy beef, mutton, and veal, form the basis of all good soups; therefore it is advisable to procure those pieces which afford the richest succulence, and such as are fresh-killed. Stale meat renders them bad, and fat is not so well adapted for making them. The principal art in composing good rich soup, is so to proportion the several ingredients that the flavour of one shall not predominate over another, and that all the articles of which it is composed, shall form an agreeable whole. To accomplish this, care must be taken that the roots and herbs are perfectly well cleaned, and that the water is proportioned to the quantity of meat and other ingredients. Generally a quart of water may be allowed to a pound of meat for soups, and half the quantity for gravies. In making soups or gravies, gentle stewing or simmering is incomparably the best. It may be remarked, however, that a really good soup can never be made but in a well-closed vessel, although, perhaps, greater wholesomeness is obtained by an occasional exposure to the air. Soups will, in general, take from three to six hours doing, and are much better prepared the day before they are wanted. When the soup is cold, the fat may be much more easily and completely removed; and when it is poured off, care must be taken not to disturb the settlings at the bottom of the vessel, which are so fine that they will escape through a sieve. A tamis is the best strainer, and if the soup is strained while it is hot, let the tamis or cloth be previously soaked in cold water. Clear soups must be perfectly transparent, and thickened soups about the consistence of cream. To thicken and give body to soups and gravies, potato-mucilage, arrow-root, bread-raspings, isinglass, flour and butter, barley, rice, or oatmeal, in a little water rubbed well together, are used. A piece of boiled beef pounded to a pulp, with a bit of butter and flour, and rubbed through a sieve, and gradually incorporated with the soup, will be found an excellent addition. When the soup appears to be too thin or too weak , the cover of the boiler should be taken off, and the contents allowed to boil till some of the watery parts have evaporated; or some of the thickening materials, above mentioned, should be added. When soups and gravies are kept from day to day in hot weather, they should be warmed up every day, and put into fresh scalded pans or tureens, and placed in a cool cellar. In temperate weather, every other day may be sufficient.

Various herbs and vegetables are required for the purpose of making soups and gravies. Of these the principal are, Scotch barley, pearl barley, wheat flour, oatmeal, bread-raspings, pease, beans, rice, vermicelli, macaroni, isinglass, potato-mucilage, mushroom or mushroom ketchup, champignons, parsnips, carrots, beetroot, turnips, garlic, shalots and onions. Sliced onions, fried with butter and flour till they are browned, and then rubbed through a sieve, are excellent to heighten the colour and flavour of brown soups and sauces, and form the basis of many of the fine relishes furnished by the cook. The older and drier the onion, the stronger will be its flavour. Leeks, cucumber, or burnet vinegar; celery or celery-seed pounded. The latter, though equally strong, does not impart the delicate sweetness of the fresh vegetable; and when used as a substitute, its flavour should be corrected by the addition of a bit of sugar. Cress-seed, parsley, common thyme, lemon thyme, orange thyme, knotted marjoram, sage, mint, winter savoury, and basil. As fresh green basil is seldom to be procured, and its fine flavour is soon lost, the best way of preserving the extract is by pouring wine on the fresh leaves.

For the seasoning of soups, bay-leaves, tomato, tarragon, chervil, burnet, allspice, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, clove, mace, black and white pepper, essence of anchovy, lemon-peel, and juice, and Seville orange-juice, are all taken. The latter imparts a finer flavour than the lemon, and the acid is much milder. These materials, with wine, mushroom ketchup, Harvey's sauce, tomato sauce, combined in various proportions, are, with other ingredients, manipulated into an almost endless variety of excellent soups and gravies. Soups, which are intended to constitute the principal part of a meal, certainly ought not to be flavoured like sauces, which are only designed to give a relish to some particular dish.

Homemaking Tip #2

How To Vacuum

To maintain the look, feel, and appearance of your
carpet you'll need to vacuum on a regular basis. If
you are new to vacuuming, you'll find the tips below
to help you when it comes to keeping your home clean:

1. Before you start, you should always inspect
the area. Pick up any objects that could cause
your vacuum cleaner to clog up. The smaller objects
are fine, just as long as they will pass through the
vacuum.

2. You should check the vacuum bag to ensure
that is isn't full already. If it is full, you
should go ahead and change it. A full bag isn't
going to suck up much dirt, as the power will be
greatly reduced due to the bag taking up a great
deal of storage and limiting the suction.

3. You should always vacuum forwards instead
of going backwards. Going forward will get the
job done quicker and you won't wear your cord out
near as fast. When going backwards, you also run
the risk of running back over your cord, which is
something you don't want to do.

4. Be sure that you overlap your strokes
to ensure that you get out all of the dirt and the
residue. You don't want to miss any of the carpet,
which is why it is important that you overlap your
strokes.

5. You should change your vacuuming
direction on occasion to reduce any type of matting
in your carpet. You can change direction without
any problems. Doing this every time you make a
sweep on the carpet or every other time you vacuum
will be good.

6. On corners, use a damp cloth or a
crevice tool attachment that hooks up to your
vacuum cleaner. This will ensure that you get the
corners and tight areas good, and they don't
stand out from the rest of the carpet.

7. You can get rid of dust particles and
dirt by waving a vacuum wand under your bed. Doing
so on occasion will ensure that your bedroom
stays clean, and smells clean as well.

For kitty litter on carpets or floors, you should
use a lightweight vacuum cleaner. To get deep
into the fibers of the carpet, you should try
an upright vacuum cleaner with a power brush. Kitty
litter can be a pain in the neck if it gets
crushed in the pile or embedded, which is why
you should get it out as quick as you can.

Give some thought to purchasing a vacuum cleaner
with a rotating brush or combination beater and
brush bar, which will loosen up the dirt in the
carpet and then suck it out. This will beat the
dirt from the fibers and even embedded dirt, which
will leave your carpet clean and smelling great.

Whenever you vacuum, you should always be on the
lookout for straw, thread, and string as it can
trap debris in the vacuum hose and result in a
clog. These types of hazards are also bad for the
agitators as well, as they can clog up the suction
as well, or get tangled up in the agitators and
cause more problems.

If you have pets, you should sprinkle some baking
soda on the carpet before you vacuum. Let it sit
for a little while, then vacuum. The baking soda
is a lot cheaper than carpet fresheners and it
does the same thing - only better.

Vacuuming is very easy to do, and it's something
that should be done on a regular basis. You don't
have to be an expert to vacuum, all you have to
do is make an effort. Your carpet will look good
all the time, and your house will stay smelling
great - which is reason enough to grab the vacuum
and take a trip through the house with it.

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